Casino barring

There are four types of barring which can be placed on customers of the casino.

  1. Barrings under Section 44 of  the Casino Act 1997
  2. Barrings under Section 45 of  the Casino Act 1997
  3. Barrings under Section 45A of  the Casino Act 1997
  4. Voluntary barring under Section 15B of  the Independent Gambling Authority Act 1995


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Barrings under section 44 of the Casino Act 1997

Under Section 44 of the Casino Act 1997, a written can be made by the casino to bar a person from gaining entry to the casino premises on any reasonable ground.  An order might be made on any one or more of the following grounds:

  • The casino believes that the welfare of a person, or the welfare of a person’s dependents is at risk through gambling
  • A person has damaged or misused equipment in the casino used for gambling
  • A person has committed, is committing or is about to commit an offence

A customer may seek a licensee barring (formerly known as a self exclusion barring) to assist in the management of the customer’s gambling. Further options can also be discussed with the Casino’s Host Responsibility department if onsite at the time or by contacting (08) 8218 4141.

A person experiencing trouble with their gambling can discuss options to regaining control, including barring from the premises, with the casino’s Host Responsibility department on (08) 8218 4141.

For how long can a person be barred?

A barring order may be made by the casino for a period of up to 3 months, unless it is made in agreement with a person, in which case it may be made for any stated period or for an unlimited period as is agreed under Section 44 of the Casino Act 1997.

How a barring order is issued

A barring becomes effective once a copy of the barring order has been received by the patron to be barred. This can be done either personally or through registered mail.

What can be done if a patron does not agree with a barring order?

If a person is aggrieved by a decision of the casino to bar them, they may apply in writing to the Liquor and Gambling Commissioner within 14 days of the order to have the decision reviewed.

The Commissioner must review the order and may uphold, vary or revoke the order.

What happens if a barred patron enters the casino?

If a barred person is allowed to enter or remain in the casino while an order remains in force, the casino licensee is guilty of an offence.  The maximum penalty which may apply is $10,000.

A barred person who enters or remains in the casino while they are barred is also guilty of an offence.  The maximum penalty which may apply is $2,500.

A casino employee or a police officer may exercise reasonable force to prevent a barred person from gaining entry or to remove a barred person from the casino premises.


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Barrings under section 45 of the Casino Act 1997

Under Section 45 of the Casino Act 1997, the Liquor and Gambling Commissioner may by written order bar a person from gaining entry to the casino premises on any reasonable ground and, in particular, on the ground that the excluded person is placing his or her own welfare, or the welfare of dependents, at risk through gambling.

The Commissioner may make an order under Section 45 of the Act:

  • on the application of a person who wishes to be barred or
  • on the application of a dependent or other person who appears to have a legitimate interest in  the welfare of the person or
  • on review of an order made by the casino to bar a person from the casino premises or
  • on the Commissioner’s own initiative

For how long can a person be barred?

The length of the barring period is at the discretion of the Liquor and Gambling Commissioner.

How a barring order is issued

The Liquor and Gambling Commissioner will issue a written barring order to the person and provide a copy of the order to the Casino.  A barring order can be effected by serving the order personally or by sending it by registered mail to the last known postal address.


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Barrings under section 45A of the Casino Act 1997

Amendments to the Casino Act 1997 now enable the Commissioner of Police to bar a person from gaining entry to the casino premises on any reasonable ground.

For how long can a person be barred?

The length of the barring order is at the discretion of the Commissioner of Police

What can be done if a patron does not agree with a barring order?

A barred person may apply to the Independent Gambling Authority to have the barring order reviewed.

What happens if a barred patron enters the casino?

If a barred person is allowed to enter or remain in the casino while an order remains in force, the Casino licensee is guilty of an offence. The maximum penalty which may apply is $10,000.

A barred person who enters or remains in the casino while they are barred is also guilty of an offence. The maximum penalty which may apply is $2,500.

A casino employee or a police officer may exercise reasonable force to prevent a barred person from gaining entry or to remove a barred person from the casino premises.


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Voluntary barring

For information on lodging an application for voluntary barring with the Independent Gambling Authority log onto the IGA website at www.iga.sa.gov.au or contact them at:

  • Independent Gambling Authority (IGA)
  • Level 4
  • 45 Grenfell Street
  • ADELAIDE  SA  5000
  • Ph: (08) 8226 7233