New labour hire laws to commence 1 March 2018 – CBS news

The Labour Hire Licensing Act 2017 will commence on 1 March 2018. The new law aims to protect workers from being exploited by providers of labour hire services.

Anyone who operates as a labour hire provider in South Australia must be licensed, and it will be unlawful for employers to use the services of an unlicensed operator.

A transitional period will be provided to allow industry time to be fully compliant. This means that all labour hire providers must be licensed by 1 September 2018. Applications must be lodged well ahead of this date to ensure that providers comply from 1 September.

A new online application form will be available from 1 March 2018. Applications can be lodged from this date. Labour hire providers will be taken to be licensed from the date the licence is granted.

The Labour Hire Licensing Regulations are currently being finalised.

Background

The South Australian Labour Hire Licensing Bill 2017 passed Parliament on 29 November 2017.

 


Reform to SA liquor laws – CBS news

Following extensive community and industry consultation, new liquor licensing laws have passed Parliament. The first stage of changes commenced on 18 December 2017.

The laws are part of comprehensive reforms to South Australia’s liquor licensing system, aiming to reduce red tape and administrative burden for industry, while strengthening our laws to minimise alcohol related violence.

Consumer and Business Services will work closely with industry bodies and liquor licence holders to ensure a smooth transition.

Future consultation

Further targeted consultation will occur in 2018, focusing on the new fee structure and aspects of the licensing regime, including:

  • new classes of licence, in particular details of the short term licence class
  • the seizure of evidence of age documents
  • disciplinary action before the Liquor and Gambling Commissioner for certain matters
  • minors on licensed premises.

The changes below commenced on 18 December 2017

Supply to minors

There are now stronger penalties for people who illegally supply alcohol to anyone under 18. Big parties and events will be targeted, where large groups of teenagers are supplied with alcohol.

Licensed businesses are still prohibited from supplying alcohol to people under 18 years old.

Entertainment consent

Licensed venues no longer need consent from Consumer and Business Services to host a range of entertainment, including music and comedy.

This makes it easier for businesses to host bands, supporting a vibrant live music scene.

Consent is still required for prescribed entertainment such as boxing, martial arts and sexually explicit entertainment.

Licensed premises must still follow the conditions of their development approval, and any conditions or approvals made under other legislation.

Temporary approval of responsible persons

These reforms streamline the responsible person process and support employment.

Temporary approval of a responsible person is now available for up to 6 months, while the employee undertakes the responsible person vetting process.

This allows employees to start work faster, without businesses needing to wait weeks or months for approval.

Applications to become a responsible person remain the same, with temporary approval being granted once the relevant forms have been lodged.

Individuals can now also apply to become a responsible person, while previously applications could only be made by the licensee employing the person.

The Liquor and Gambling Commissioner can revoke approval of a responsible person at any time.

Licence-holders can search whether a responsible person is approved, temporarily approved or revoked on the CBS website.

Exemptions for low-risk businesses

Low-risk businesses no longer require a liquor licence to treat their clients to a drink, reducing administrative burden and supporting industry.

Exempt businesses can sell or supply liquor without a licence in certain circumstances, including:

  • hairdressers and barbers
  • cruise ships
  • retirement villages
  • businesses selling gifts
  • jewellers
  • patient care accommodation.

The current licence exemption for bed and breakfast style accommodation has also been extended. For example, bed and breakfasts with a capacity of up to 16 guests can now supply alcohol without a licence under certain conditions, while previously this was limited to 8 guests.

Other red-tape reduction

A number of other red-tape reduction measures also came into effect on 18 December:

  • abolishing the requirement for some licensed businesses to provide meals at the request of a member of the public or a lodger
  • removal of designated dining areas, reception areas and sampling areas
  • removal of most notification and advertising requirements that currently apply to licence applications
  • administrative changes to streamline the appointment of inspectors, clarify definitions and allow the Liquor and Gambling Commissioner to publish determinations and exclude information where appropriate.

Registering a relationship in South Australia

Couples can now register their relationship with Births, Deaths and Marriages (BDM) if at least one person in the relationship lives in South Australia. Couples may apply irrespective of their sex or gender identity.

People who have been married before, been in a relationship registered in South Australia or in a ‘corresponding law’ registered relationship – a relationship registered under similar laws in another state or county –  will need to show that the previous relationship has ended with evidence such as a divorce certificate, nullity order, death certificate.

Relationship ceremonies

Couples are not required to have a ceremony when they register their relationship. However, relationship ceremonies can be conducted at Chesser House, performed by one of our Registry staff.

Registry office relationship ceremonies

Couples can order a standard certificate or commemorative certificate package.

Evidence of a relationship

Evidence of a relationship is not required to register a relationship but applications must be accompanied by completed statutory declarations witnessed by an authorised person and  evidence of identity and age of both people. Payment of the appropriate fee is also required.

Overseas documents need to be translated into English by an accredited translator.

‘Corresponding law’ relationships

The Relationships Register Regulations 2017 provides detail regarding corresponding law registered relationships. Couples can apply for a certificate for corresponding law relationships. However, if it is recognised by another corresponding jurisdiction, a relationship cannot be re-registered in South Australia. Contact BDM if you would like to apply for a corresponding law relationship certificate – registrations.bdm@sa.gov.au

Ending a relationship

Either person in a registered relationship can apply to have their relationship end by completing a Revoke a registered relationship – application form.

If only one person makes the application, a copy of ‘service of revocation statement’ must be served to the other person. This statement is supplied in Section A of the Revoke a registered relationship – application’ form.   An application to revoke a relationship takes 90 days once the application has been received by BDM.

Contact BDM if you don’t have all the required documents or to find out more about registering your relationship – phone 131 882 .

Apply to register your relationship at www.sa.gov.au/bdm

Frequently asked questions – Registering a relationship in South Australia