Unlicensed air-conditioning contractor to pay – media release

A South Australian air-conditioning contractor has been ordered to pay more than $34,000 in compensation and fines in the Adelaide Magistrates Court.

Kain Selby-Fullgrabe, 43, sole director of Town and Country Building Management Pty Ltd, pleaded guilty to breaches of the Australian Consumer Law (SA) in the Adelaide Magistrates Court this week for aiding and abetting the company to take deposits from consumers and failing to provide the goods and services within a reasonable time.

The company also pleaded guilty to charges of carrying on business as a building work contractor and electrical contractor without a licence and five counts of accepting payment for services and not providing those services within a reasonable time.

The court heard that, on five separate occasions between September 2014 and January 2015, Selby-Fullgrabe, who lives in the Adelaide Hills, provided quotes and took deposits for the installation and removal of air-conditioning units in Adelaide and on Yorke Peninsula but failed to provide the goods and services.

The matters were escalated to Compulsory Conciliation Conferences held by Consumer and Business Services, where Selby-Fullgrabe agreed to refund the deposits, but failed to do so.

In sentencing submissions, counsel for the Commissioner for Consumer Affairs submitted there were aggravating factors that highlighted the seriousness of the offending, including Selby-Fullgrabe’s acceptance of deposits from clients, and refusal to engage with them when work was not commenced.

Mr Grasso recorded convictions on all counts against the company and Mr Selby-Fullgrabe personally. He imposed one penalty against the company of $10,000, and a separate penalty of $10,000 against Mr Selby-Fullgrabe, prosecution costs of $800, and also ordered that Mr Selby-Fullgrabe pay compensation to each of the consumers totalling $13,786.

Commissioner for Consumer Affairs, Dini Soulio, said Mr Selby-Fullgrabe’s actions were serious and that the convictions should send a significant deterrent to tradespeople who might be minded to take deposits from consumers and not follow through with the services contracted for.

To check whether a builder is licensed, visit the Consumer and Business Services website at www.cbs.sa.gov.au. To report any concerns about a builder or contractor, contact CBS on 131 882.

Read more – unlicensed air-conditioning contractor to pay


Fire sprinkler ‘test and inspect’ registration

A new registration category has been created for people who ‘test and inspect’ fire sprinklers – or fire suppression systems. This will reduce regulatory requirements for those who only undertake this type of plumbing work.

New requirements to ‘test and inspect’ fire sprinklers

Condition of registration: Restricted plumbing work limited to the 6 monthly or more frequent testing and inspecting of fire suppression systems specified by AS1851.

Scope of work: Inspecting or testing a fire protection service consisting of water pipes and firefighting equipment (such as sprinklers, hoses and hydrants) that are connected to the mains water supply. It does not include annual or greater testing – e.g. 3 yearly.  It does not include installation or repair work.

Required qualification: The following units of competency are to be completed from the CPP20511 Certificate II in Fire Protection Inspection and Testing:

  • CPPCMN2002A   – Participate in workplace safety arrangements
  • CPPFES2006A    – Prepare for installation and servicing operations
  • CPPFES2004A    – Identify types of installed fire safety equipment and systems
  • CPCPFS3020A    – Conduct basic functional testing of water-based fire-suppression systems
  • CPCPFS3021A    – Inspect and test fire pump sets
  • CPPFES2010A    – Inspect and test fire hose reels
  • CPPFES2037A    – Inspect and test fire hydrant systems
  • CPPFES2047A    – Inspect and test control and indicating equipment

Although these are the minimum qualifications required, applicants should consider completing additional units to gain the full Certificate II in order to improve their employment prospects.

Training organisations

The following Registered Training Organisations are those known to CBS to be offering this training in South Australia.  Cost and study requirements may vary between training providers.  Some may only provide training in SA once minimum student numbers are reached.

  • Fire Protection Association Australia, T: 1300 731 922, E: training@fpaa.com.au
  • Haz-Ed Services, T: (08) 9248 8099, E: admin@haz-ed.com.au
  • Pacific Institute of Technology, T: (08) 7200 3802, E: admin@pit.edu.au

Existing ‘test and inspect’ workers without formal qualifications may be able to obtain Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) for all or most of the units.  Those with other formal qualifications are encouraged to contact Consumer and Business Services to check whether these would be acceptable.

Those inspections that are required to be carried out annually or after a longer period of time under AS1851 must be done by a person who holds a plumbing workers registration that authorises this work, such as a registration restricted to fire protection work.

‘Test and inspect’ workers have to the end of January 2018 to ensure that they hold the appropriate registration. After January 2018 compliance checking by CBS will commence.


Registering a relationship in South Australia

Couples can now register their relationship with Births, Deaths and Marriages (BDM) if at least one person in the relationship lives in South Australia. Couples may apply irrespective of their sex or gender identity.

People who have been married before, been in a relationship registered in South Australia or in a ‘corresponding law’ registered relationship – a relationship registered under similar laws in another state or county –  will need to show that the previous relationship has ended with evidence such as a divorce certificate, nullity order, death certificate.

Relationship ceremonies

Couples are not required to have a ceremony when they register their relationship. However, relationship ceremonies can be conducted at Chesser House, performed by one of our Registry staff.

Registry office relationship ceremonies

Couples can order a standard certificate or commemorative certificate package.

Evidence of a relationship

Evidence of a relationship is not required to register a relationship but applications must be accompanied by completed statutory declarations witnessed by an authorised person and  evidence of identity and age of both people. Payment of the appropriate fee is also required.

Overseas documents need to be translated into English by an accredited translator.

‘Corresponding law’ relationships

The Relationships Register Regulations 2017 provides detail regarding corresponding law registered relationships. Couples can apply for a certificate for corresponding law relationships. However, if it is recognised by another corresponding jurisdiction, a relationship cannot be re-registered in South Australia. Contact BDM if you would like to apply for a corresponding law relationship certificate – registrations.bdm@sa.gov.au

Ending a relationship

Either person in a registered relationship can apply to have their relationship end by completing a Revoke a registered relationship – application form.

If only one person makes the application, a copy of ‘service of revocation statement’ must be served to the other person. This statement is supplied in Section A of the Revoke a registered relationship – application’ form.   An application to revoke a relationship takes 90 days once the application has been received by BDM.

Contact BDM if you don’t have all the required documents or to find out more about registering your relationship – phone 131 882 .

Apply to register your relationship at www.sa.gov.au/bdm

Frequently asked questions – Registering a relationship in South Australia


Buying a used car?

You might save a few dollars if you buy from a private seller, but there are more risks than buying from a licensed car dealer.

Used cars – don’t miss out on warranty protection.

Transcript – warranty protection

Used cars – avoid hidden damage when buying a vehicle.

Transcript – hidden damage

Used cars – make sure your car doesn’t get repossessed.

Transcript – repossessed

Checklist – before you buy:

  • Set a price limit you can afford. Allow for stamp duty, transfer fees, registration and insurance.
  • Take your time. Don’t be rushed or pressured.
  • Shop around for the best deal.
  • Have the car checked by a qualified independent mechanic before you buy
  • Don’t sign anything until you’re sure the car is okay and you really want to buy it
  • When you buy a car it will need to be registered in your name.

If you buy from a car dealer:

  • Understand your rights and the dealer’s obligations
  • Check what is covered by the warranty
  • Inspect the white display sheet on the car
  • Have everything you negotiate with the dealer in writing
  • Check the dealer’s licence is up to date

If you buy privately:

  • Is the seller the registered owner? If not, is there a genuine reason?
  • Check that the car hasn’t been stolen, flood damaged or written off, and that no money is owed on the car. Visit the Personal Property Securities Register

For more information

Helpful links

 


Product safety standard on portable ethanol burners – CBS news

In March 2017 Federal Small Business Minister Michael McCormack imposed a national interim ban to prevent the supply of certain types of decorative alcohol-fuelled devices, also known as ethanol burners.

It was implemented after serious injuries were reported, raising concerns about their safety.

The national interim ban comes to an end on 14 July 2017, and will be replaced by a safety standard from 15 July 2017.

The new safety standard:

  • prevents the supply of table top devices (devices which weigh less than 8 kilograms or have a footprint less than 900 square centimetres); and
  • requires freestanding and fixed devices to meet a stability test, come with a fuel container with a flame arrester (or an automatic fuel pump system) and display warnings on the device about refuelling hazards.

Products intended for cooking or heating are exempt from the safety standard.

The safety standard gives device suppliers three months to transition from the national interim ban to the new requirements in the safety standard.

Mr McCormack noted that some suppliers of safe devices are intending to develop a voluntary standard with Standards Australia which will provide additional protections for consumers, a move that is welcomed and strongly supported.

Retailers and suppliers can go to the ACCC’s product safety website to get further information on the new safety standard.

Consumers seeking to purchase decorative alcohol-fuelled devices should check  that the device complies with the safety standard.

Those concerned about products they have previously purchased should visit the Product Safety Australia website for information about the safety standard, consumer rights and how to use burners safely.

Read the national media release – Safety standard for ethanol burners (PDF 113KB)


Unlicensed car dealer slugged $3000 – media release

A 35 year old Salisbury Downs man has been fined $3000 for selling used cars without a licence.

Under South Australia’s Second-hand Vehicle Dealer Act, anyone who buys or sells more than four used cars within a period of twelve months must hold the relevant licence.

In the Elizabeth Magistrates Court, Feras Said admitted to selling six used cars over an eight month period for between $2500 and $6500, and offering to sell a seventh without holding the relevant licence.

Read more – unlicensed car dealer slugged $3000


Validating digital licences and proof of age passes

The South Australian Government has begun introducing digital passes and licences. This means that South Australians can carry selected Government issued passes and licences on an Apple or Android smart phone or tablet device.

Digital passes and licences will be introduced in stages. Proof of age passes, boat licences, and land agent and land sales representative registrations became available on 29 May 2017.  Additional passes, licences and other functions will be added to the system from the second half of 2017.

Digital passes and licences are provided through the mySA GOV account (an update of the EzyReg account) and mySA GOV app. Digital passes and licences displayed in the mySA GOV app are a valid form of identification.

While current plastic and paper passes and licences will continue to be issued, some people may choose to only carry their digital proof of age pass.

Liquor licensees, Security and Investigation Agents, and justices of the peace will need to be able to verify digital passes or licences, commencing with proof of age passes from 29 May 2017.

There are two ways a digital pass or licence can be validated:

  • “Shake-to-animate”

If you do not have a smartphone or tablet, you can view the digital pass or licence in the app on the pass/licence holder’s smartphone or tablet. A “shake-to-animate” security feature has been added to the app. This feature animates the screen with a “tick”. It is recommended that you ask the digital pass or licence holder to ‘shake to animate’ the screen and see the tick to prove that the visual is not a photo or screenshot.

  • Create a mySA GOV account and install mySA GOV app on your smartphone or tablet

Once a mySA GOV account has been created, log into the app, press the validate button and point your camera at the barcode on the pass you wish to verify. (For businesses with several staff, separate accounts will need to be created for each staff person as accounts cannot be shared across multiple devices simultaneously). To create a mySA GOV account visit — sa.gov.au/mysagov

For more information about the mySA GOV app, setting up a mySA GOV account, and validating digital passes and licences visit — my.sa.gov.au

If you need help creating a mySA GOV account call Service SA on 1300 450 422 (Monday to Friday) during business hours or email — myaccountassistance@sa.gov.au


Digital licences for Land Agents and Land Sales Representatives

The South Australian Government has begun introducing digital passes and licences. This means that South Australians can carry selected government issued passes and licences on an Apple or Android smart phone or tablet device.

Digital passes and licences will be introduced in stages. Proof of age passes, boat licences, and land agent and land sales representative registrations became available on 29 May 2017.  Additional passes, licences and other functions will be added to the system from the second half of 2017.

Digital passes and licences are provided through the mySA GOV account (an update of the EzyReg account) and mySA GOV app. Digital passes and licences displayed in the mySA GOV app are a valid form of identification.

Current plastic and paper passes and licences will continue to be issued. While you can choose to carry your government issued passes or licences digitally on a smart phone or tablet, it is recommended that you keep carrying your plastic and paper passes or licences for an initial period of transition to ensure that businesses and consumers who use your services are able to verify your credentials.

How do you obtain a digital pass or licence?

To access your land agent and land sales representative registrations digitally, you will need to create a new mySA GOV account by visiting sa.gov.au/mysagov and then download the mySA GOV app and follow the prompts. If you have an existing EzyReg account you can log into the mySA GOV account using the same login details.

If you need help creating a mySA GOV account call Service SA on 1300 450 422 (Monday to Friday) during business hours or email — myaccountassistance@sa.gov.au

For more information about the mySA GOV app, setting up a mySA GOV account, and validating digital passes and licences visit — my.sa.gov.au

Go digital – land agent and sales representative registration flyer


Changes for charities in South Australia

As of 1 December 2016 changes to the Collections for Charitable Purposes Act 1939 (the Act) reduced the administrative burden on charities registered with the Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission (ACNC).

The changes make it easier for charities to meet their responsibilities and mandatory reporting requirements.

Benefits of ACNC registration

Benefits for charities, who also choose to be registered with the ACNC include:

  • reporting to only one government department reduces duplication.
  • charities registered with ACNC don’t have to report to or lodge financial statements with CBS
  • time and cost savings – charities with a revenue of less than $250,000 no longer have submit audited financial reports
  • tax concessions and other exemptions (may be available).

When you register with the ACNC for the first time you will need advise CBS of your registration using the online notification form.

If you are already registered with the ACNC, you must complete the online notification form to advise CBS of your registration.

Charities registered with the ACNC will still be required to comply with the Charities Code of Practice and will be listed on the CBS Public charities register.

Information for prescribed associations

Licence to collect

If you are an organisation that intends to collect for a charitable purpose as defined by the Act, you must hold a Collections for Charitable Purposes Licence (CCP Licence).

Please note if you are registered with the ACNC and have notified CBS of your registration, you are automatically licensed in South Australia.

For more information regarding charities in SA visit www.sa.gov.au