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Consumer & Business Advice
Media releases
4 April 2013

Inspections by South Australia's consumer watchdog on baby goods retailers has resulted in the nationwide recall of hundreds of dodgy items that could have harmed babies.

During the inspection, product safety inspectors from Consumer and Business Services identified a stroller and a dummy that each posed a danger to babies.

Paul White, the Commissioner for Consumer Affairs said during the compliance checks, the two products were found to not meet the mandatory safety standards.

"In the case of the dummy - a Curaprox Pacifier - officers found it failed to comply to a number of aspects of the standard, including not having a ring or handle, being packaged with a strap to attach the dummy to baby’s clothing and not having a warning about the strangulation hazard," Commissioner White said.

"Such an item must contain the warning: DO NOT TIE SOOTHER AROUND BABY’S NECK.

"Officers immediately seized 36 dummies from the shelves, and Swiss, the supplier of the Curaprox Pacifier, has recalled 228 dummies nationally following the detection of these non-compliant products in the marketplace.

"Officers also removed a stroller from sale because it didn't have a mandatory safety warning on the tether strap, which could have resulted in carers being unaware of the danger of the stroller and baby rolling away.

"The Uppababy Alta stroller’s tether straps were found to be missing the mandatory warning which must state: USE THIS STRAP TO STOP THE STROLLER ROLLING AWAY.

"The mandatory safety standard came into effect on 1 July 2008 following the tragic deaths of two South Australian babies when their strollers rolled into the River Torrens.

"Coolkidz, the supplier of the Uppababy stroller has undertaken a nation-wide voluntary recall of 566 strollers and will supply replacement tether straps which comply with the mandatory safety standard.

Enforcement action is being considered for these breaches, which can include a warning, expiation of $1 200 or penalties up to $1.1 million for a company or $220 000 for an individual.

Further information about product safety is available at: www.productsafety.gov.au