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Liquor, Gambling & Lotteries
Media releases
16 April 2013

The State Government will accelerate the introduction of pre-commitment technology with a raft of reforms to gaming machine laws.

In announcing the draft legislation, Minister for Business Services and Consumers John Rau said the reforms will place South Australia in front of Commonwealth changes announced last year.

“The reforms accelerate the introduction of pre-commitment systems to support customers to gamble within their limits,” Mr Rau said.

“They also support venues and staff in identifying and addressing problem gambling.

“Importantly, these reforms are designed to decrease the number of gaming machines and gaming venues in South Australia.”

Under the proposed laws, from 1 July 2014, venues can chose to become a ‘Major venue’ with a greater focus on systems aimed at reducing problem gambling or a ‘Minor venue’ where gaming is incidental to food and beverage service.

Major venues
•    Maximum of 60 machines from 1 January 2017
•    Voluntary pre-commitment and automated risk monitoring by 1 January 2017
•    Maximum bet of $5 per spin (reduced from $10) from 1 January 2017
•    All Gaming machines to support on-screen messages from 1 January 2017
•    Daily withdrawal limit of $250 from 1 February 2014 (as per Commonwealth reform)
•    Responsible gambling agreement required

Minor venues
•    Maximum of 20 machines from 1 January 2017
•    Maximum bet of $5 per spin (reduced from $10) from 1 January 2017
•    Must be closed between 2am and 10am from 1 January 2017
•    Will not have automated coin machines from 1 January 2020
•    Daily withdrawal limit of $250 from 1 February 2014 (as per Commonwealth reform)
•    No loyalty schemes by 1 July 2016

All venues will need to meet new training requirements to support the introduction of pre- commitment machines in South Australia.

They will also be required to introduce new in-venue signage to support customer budget setting and gambling help services.
 
“Major venues that want to purchase further machine entitlements will need to do so from existing entitlement holders through the current trading system,” Mr Rau said.

“The increased activity in that market will result in the number of machines decreasing as this system eliminates one in every four entitlements sold.

“The Adelaide Casino will also be required to introduce a similar range of new responsible gambling measures – the strongest responsible gambling measures applied to any casino in Australia.

“Significant work has been undertaken with the industry and community sector to refine the legislation and where possible to eliminate red tape.”

The legislation will be introduced into Parliament during the next sitting week.